The Growth and Giggles Blog

Ideas for helping parents and their preschoolers.

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Teaching Kids About Money, Part 2 In Teaching Kids About Money, Part 1, we laid a foundation about beginning to help your children think about money -- immediate and delayed gratification, spending, and generosity. In Part 2, we set a few more helpful concepts in place before giving some practical games for teaching about money in Part 3. Once your children start getting the ideas introduced in Part 1, you can introduce them to budgeting: allotting some of their money to different categories (charitable giving, saving, food, etc.). This is an important value to plant and nurture.  In regards to spending what you have budgeted together, show the child how much frivolous spending adds up. Teach them to give up little things: a coffee here, a soda there, a Dollar Tree treat here and there. Physically collect the money that these little things would have cost so your children can see how much money they could have to work...
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Teaching Kids About Money, Part 1 Families have different views on how they spend their money. This post is not written to tell you how to spend your money. These are just ideas for you to think about, tweak, and make fit your own family. One foundational issue with money and how to use it is about gratification. Should we quest after instant gratification or delayed gratification? As parents, we want to help our children think through this as they mature. There is a spectrum: Spend Thrift ---- to ---- Skin Flint (always instant gratification ---- to ---- always delayed gratification) Generosity is somewhere between those two. And money is just one of many areas that we can teach the concept of gratification (food, sex, rest, etc.). Each family has their own goals and principles to teach their kids about money. For instance, in our family, we want to teach a general stance of delaying our own gratification...
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Posted by on in Character Training
Lying Sometimes children lie -- because they're afraid.  Sometimes children lie because they have become afraid of the person they are lying to.  If you think your child is experimenting with lying, begin by writing down every time you observe it happen. What situation did it appear in? What brought it about? You can also keep a chart. You may begin to discern patterns. When you address the child, if they respond with an expression of "I don't care" or of simply not caring to try to be truthful, try backing away a bit to see if something else is going on. Sometimes tweaking the way we correct a situation may help.  Is the child understanding? Sometimes children have a slower processing of words.  Is the child afraid?  Is the child holding their emotions in? In thinking about the discipline, it is not about becoming more harsh. It is more often about...
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How to Stretch Your Child Out of Their Activity Comfort-Zone People are born with certain temperments. These temperments do not necessarily define the person. And we can all be helped in stretching ourselves beyond our own boundaries. Not to be as rigid as we might like. Some are introverts. Some are extroverts. And everything in between. One definition of an introvert is a person who uses or loses energy around a group of people. And one definition of an extrovert is a person who gets energy out of groups of people. Every human being can function well within a variety of situations. Most people fall somewhere in the middle of this introversion-extroversion spectrum. Prefered activity types can be indicators of a child's temperment. Very introverted children who have not practiced social skills can be quiet and withdrawn. These children need to be encouraged to learn to enjoy social movement and to be healthy in that way. Very extroverted children need to learn...
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Posted by on in Character Training
Building Character Game When children have problems, parents often focus on the negative. Constantly focusing upon the faults of our children can cause great pain and can damage their self-esteem. In addition, being critical often hurts our relationships with those we criticize. How do we stop? It does very little good to concentrate all of our efforts on not doing something we want to stop. The most effective way to change is to concentrate on doing the opposite good in place of the bad. If people try to stop overeating, it is torture, and it usually fails if they simply try not to eat as much. They think of the food they cannot have, crave it, wish for it -- which means it is always on their mind -- until they finally give in. Success comes if (1) they think of and prepare some foods they can eat, plus (2) plan activities to do...
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